Blue Japanese Wisteria Vine 5 Seeds – Hard to Find!

April 21, 2014 - Comment

Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda). Japanese wisteria was brought from Japan to the United States in 1860 by George Rogers Hall. Since then, it has become one of the most highly romanticized flowering garden plants. It is also a common subject for bonsai, along with Wisteria sinensis(Chinese wisteria) The flowering habit of Japanese wisteria is perhaps

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Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda). Japanese wisteria was brought from Japan to the United States in 1860 by George Rogers Hall. Since then, it has become one of the most highly romanticized flowering garden plants. It is also a common subject for bonsai, along with Wisteria sinensis(Chinese wisteria)

The flowering habit of Japanese wisteria is perhaps the most spectacular of the Wisteria family. It sports the longest flower racemes of any wisteria; they can reach nearly half a meter in length. These racemes burst into great trails of clustered blue flowers in early- to mid-spring. The flowers carry a distinctive fragrance similar to that of grapes.

Japanese wisteria can grow over 30m long over many supports via powerful clockwise-twining stems. The foliage consists of shiny, dark-green, pinnately compound leaves 10-30cm in length. The leaves bear 9-13 oblong leaflets that are each 2-6 cm long. It also bears brown, velvety, bean-like seed pods 5-10cm long that mature in summer and persist until winter. Japanese wisteria prefers moist soils and full sun in USDA plant hardiness zones 5-9. The plant often lives over fifty years.

Product Features

  • Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda).
  • Japanese wisteria was brought from Japan to the United States in 1860 by George Rogers Hall
  • The flowering habit of Japanese wisteria is perhaps the most spectacular of the Wisteria family
  • Full Sun
  • Hardy Zones 5-9

Comments

D. Heaton says:

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Jake says:

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Amarithe says:

Good Service Seeds arrived a day before they were expected, the package (and the seeds, which totaled 6) were in good shape. I look forward to watching them grow and I appreciate the chance to grow such a lovely plant for such an agreeable price.I put one in a bag with a moist paper towel yesterday and am awaiting the results. I have heard of several different methods of germinating the seeds, ranging from the paper towel method, to planting just beneath the soil surface, to soaking, as well as nicking before soaking. However, they are hardy plants, and I figured the paper towel method would suffice for a first try.I noticed that several individuals gave this store a lower rating due to not fully understanding or researching what they were buying first. So, some notes:*The wisteria may not bloom for 10 years. If you would like one to bloom sooner, you should try growing a cutting from a mature plant.*It is a vine plant, but can be trained into a…

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